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Current Topic is Iron

Iron has been said to be the mother of gold.

Iron is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Fe and atomic number 26. Iron is a group 8 and period 4 metal. Iron is notable for being the final element produced by stellar nucleosynthesis, and thus the heaviest element which does not require a supernova or similarly cataclysmic event for its formation. It is therefore the most abundant heavy metal in the universe.

Its symbol Fe is an abbreviation of ferrum, the Latin word for iron.

Iron is the most abundant metal on Earth, and is believed to be the tenth most abundant element in the universe. Iron is also the most abundant (by mass, 34.6%) element making up the Earth; the concentration of iron in the various layers of the Earth ranges from high at the inner core to about 5% in the outer crust; it is possible the Earth's inner core consists of a single iron crystal although it is more likely to be a mixture of iron and nickel; the large amount of iron in the Earth is thought to contribute to its magnetic field.

Iron is a metal extracted from iron ore, and is hardly ever found in the free (elemental) state. In order to obtain elemental iron, the impurities must be removed by chemical reduction. Iron is used in the production of steel, which is not an element but an alloy, a solution of different metals (and some non-metals, particularly carbon).
 

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Chrysocolla

When it comes to finding gold we all know certain indicators can help us along the way. One of the most overlooked by some people is Chrysocolla. Chrysocolla is found in the oxidation zone of copper deposits, often encrusting or replacing earlier secondary minerals. It can be very low grade or highgrade when found in the field. It is a very minor ore of copper. The colors are Green, bluish green, blue, blackish blue, or brown. Chrysocolla  is associated with Azurite, Quartz and Malachite as well as a few others. The name was first used by Theophrastus in 315 B.C. and comes from the Greek chrysos, meaning "gold," and kolla, meaning "glue," in allusion to the name of the material used to solder gold. It is also mentioned in "De Re Metallica" written before 1600 AD by Georgius Agricola; I highly recommend this book.

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Chrysocolla (hydrated copper silicate) is a mineral, CuSiO3ĚnH2O. It is of secondary origin and forms in the oxidation zones of copper ore bodies. Associated minerals are quartz, limonite, azurite, malachite, cuprite, and other secondary copper minerals.

Chrysocolla is an attractive blue-green colour and is minor ore of copper, having a hardness of 2.5 to 3.5. It is also used as an ornamental stone. It is typically found as glassy botryoidal or rounded masses and crusts, or vein fillings.

The name comes from the Greek chrysos, "gold", and kolla, "glue", in allusion to the name of the material used to solder gold, and was first used by Theophrastus in 315 BC.